Obruni Radio

It was easier to explain Sudan’s conflicts with simple dichotomies. The North-South civil war was invariably reduced to “the Muslim North versus the Christian South.” I’m sure you’ve read this sentence before.

When commentators and writers realized that Darfuris were Muslim too, the Darfur genocide became an “Arab versus African” conflict.

But the global community knows next to nothing about the reality of Sudan

— Read more in “Why we’re ignoring the revolution in Sudan“by Mohamed El Dahshan; a very insightful and analytical article on the situation in Sudan from an outsider’s point of view and why Media isn’t interested.  (via rhapsodicstanza)


telegantmess:

kemetically-ankhtified:

israelfacts:

Israel to put thousands of Africans in detention camp
(AFP) JERUSALEM — Israel’s interior minister said on Friday he hoped to soon start moving tens of thousands of illegal African migrants from Tel Aviv and elsewhere to a detention camp being built and a planned “tent city.”
An Israeli court cleared the way on Thursday for the deportation of an estimated 1,500 South Sudanese, after ruling that their lives were no longer threatened in their homeland.
Interior Minister Eli Yishai told public radio 40,000 Sudanese and Eritreans were next in his sights.
“They are close to being expelled either willingly or against their will,” he said. “This is a number that threatens the Jewish identity.”
The rising number of Africans in Israel has hit the headlines in recent weeks, after a spike in racial tensions led to a riot in southern Tel Aviv, where tens of thousands of migrants live.
Interior ministry statistics show that approximately 60,000 African immigrants have entered Israel illegally, the vast majority of them from Sudan and Eritrea.
Some are refugees fleeing persecution in their home nations, but others are economic migrants.
“I hope that in the coming months we shall be able to move all the infiltrators to detention facilities and allow Israeli citizens in south Tel Aviv and others to live in a proper way … in quiet and security,” he added.
Israel is building a giant, hi-tech security barrier along its 240-kilometre (150-mile) border with the Egyptian Sinai.
So far 170 kilometres have been erected and the project is due to be completed later this year.
Photo: An Eritrean woman stands with her daughter outside an apartment which is home to African migrants after unknown attackers, thought to be right-wing Israelis, set it ablaze overnight in Jerusalem on July 4, 2012. (Getty Images)
read more»


I feel sick.
View Larger

telegantmess:

kemetically-ankhtified:

israelfacts:

Israel to put thousands of Africans in detention camp

(AFP) JERUSALEM — Israel’s interior minister said on Friday he hoped to soon start moving tens of thousands of illegal African migrants from Tel Aviv and elsewhere to a detention camp being built and a planned “tent city.”

An Israeli court cleared the way on Thursday for the deportation of an estimated 1,500 South Sudanese, after ruling that their lives were no longer threatened in their homeland.

Interior Minister Eli Yishai told public radio 40,000 Sudanese and Eritreans were next in his sights.

“They are close to being expelled either willingly or against their will,” he said. “This is a number that threatens the Jewish identity.”

The rising number of Africans in Israel has hit the headlines in recent weeks, after a spike in racial tensions led to a riot in southern Tel Aviv, where tens of thousands of migrants live.

Interior ministry statistics show that approximately 60,000 African immigrants have entered Israel illegally, the vast majority of them from Sudan and Eritrea.

Some are refugees fleeing persecution in their home nations, but others are economic migrants.

“I hope that in the coming months we shall be able to move all the infiltrators to detention facilities and allow Israeli citizens in south Tel Aviv and others to live in a proper way … in quiet and security,” he added.

Israel is building a giant, hi-tech security barrier along its 240-kilometre (150-mile) border with the Egyptian Sinai.

So far 170 kilometres have been erected and the project is due to be completed later this year.

Photo: An Eritrean woman stands with her daughter outside an apartment which is home to African migrants after unknown attackers, thought to be right-wing Israelis, set it ablaze overnight in Jerusalem on July 4, 2012. (Getty Images)

read more»

I feel sick.

(Source: thebowspring)


thepoliticalnotebook:

No to Dictatorship (لا للديكتاتورية).” While things are heating up protest-wise in Sudan, four musicians, all hailing from different tribes, collaborated on this awesome piece of protest music challenging dictatorship and political repression. 

لا للسلطه الابديه نحن نريد الحريه

No to eternal power. We want freedom.

(The Arabic lyrics are in the video’s description… If I have time in the coming week, I’ll give translating them into English a shot.)

[YouTube]

I love protest music


Day 19 of March is for African Music Month

Song: We Want Peace

Artist: Emmanuel Jal

Country: Sudan

Sudan is one of Africa’s largest countries. Resting right between Egypt, Ethiopia, the CAR, and Chad, Sudan has always been a divided country. With a mostly Arabic Muslim Northern population and a predominantly Christian Southern population, there is a great deal of conflict amongst population caused by this racial and religious division. Many civil wars have raged and caused the recruitment of child soldiers for whom Emmanuel Jal sings.

Emmanuel Jal is a Sudanese rapper and former child soldier. In 2008, Jal released his first album entitled “Warchild” to bring attention to the world’s roughly 300,000 child soldiers.

Last summer, Sudan separated into two separate countries: Sudan and South Sudan. This song was released prior to the January 2011 referendum, which decided that the country would separate into two independent nations. Jal’s purpose in writing the song was to promote peace in Sudan, regardless of the outcome. With the recent conflicts in Sudan, this video remains relevant and shows that hip-hop can make a difference.


voa60news:

Today’s VOA60 Africa

South Africa: Trade Unions are holding nationwide protests against new tolls on roads between Johannesburg and Pretoria.

Ghana: Web entrepreneurs are developing online applications they hope will radically transform the way business is done in Africa.

Sudan: Teachers and international aid groups are working together in Darfur to increase the number of girls in school.

Republic of Congo: Thousands made homeless by arms depot blasts are taking shelter at makeshift settlements in Brazzaville.

Kenya: Buddhist leader from Japan holds healing ceremony to promote peace between country’s Turkana, Pokot, Samburu and Njemp ethnic groups.


Sudan: Police Storm Khartoum University's Compounds, Over 300 Students Arrested →

dynamicafrica:

Sudanese police in the early morning of Friday raided dormitories of the University of Khartoum and arrested over three hundred students in anticipation of a new protest they planned to stage this weekend.

Since December students organised different protests in Khartoum asking to remove the Director of the University who asked the police to enter in the campus to disperse a student protest. The students demonstrated in support of the al-Manasir’s demand for compensation, as they have been affected by the construction of Merowe Dam in their homelands.

Since, the University was closed in order to avoid any escalation while the student were asked to return to their homes in the different provinces. However, many remained in the campus and called for a new sit-in outside the Director’s office on 19 Sunday February.

At dawn of Friday which is a weekend holiday, the anti-riot police cordoned off the housing and started to evict the students, an eyewitness told Sudan Tribune. The source added that hundreds of the National Security Service members dressed in plain clothes participated in the preventive arrest of 317 students.

“The police armed with batons entered in the dormitories and arrested the sleeping student. Those who tried to resist were severely beaten,” he said.

A detained student, speaking under conditions of anonymity, said they were transferred with other 50 students to a police station in Khartoum North where they were interrogated about their political affiliation and academic studies. He added the students were distributed to 10 different police centres for investigation.

Most of the detainees were released later during the day but were prevented from returning to the compound while others are still detained in unknown place.

Mohamed Abdallah Ibrahim, financial secretary of the Union of Students in Khartoum State condemned the raid on the university compound and stated that leaders of the Union intervened in eight police stations to release the arrested students.

He also disclosed that the police found among the detainees some people who were not students, but he added that the compound harbours workers and relatives of the students. He added that other compounds in Khartoum and Omdurman house the students of the two closed dormitories.

Al Fatih Hasabo, a member of University of Khartoum Students Committee, told reporters in a press conference that the raid on the compounds is “a remake of intrusion scenario and undue humiliation of students”.

He added the students were incarcerated without charges and jailed with criminal.

Another member of the committee, Mohamed Omer Taha, said they stopped the negotiations with the administration of the University and intend to send a memorandum to the President Omer Hassan al-Bashir.

He added they refused the intervention of the Director to secure their release, stressing they do not trust the University administration.

Last December, the students protested against a decision by the administration of the University authorising the police to enter the campus. The protesters asked for the resignation of the Director Sidiq Haiati for allowing the police to arrest al-Manasir’s students who demonstrated inside the University.

They also demand that the police forces are held accountable and that they receive an apology from the ministry of interior as well as compensating for those students who were affected by the incidents.

Sudanese authorities accuse opposition political parties of standing behind the unrest in Khartoum University, but the students deny such accusations.


ohyeahsudan:

“Eid Al-Adha feast, Sudanese style”

Today is the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha. Eid al-Adha marks the tenth day of DuhlHijjah, the last  month of the Islamic year. It is known as the day of sacrifice because it honors Abraham/Ibrahim’s willingness to obey God even at the cost of sacrificing his son. The holiday is marked with much prayer an the sacrifice of a lamb.  View Larger

ohyeahsudan:

“Eid Al-Adha feast, Sudanese style”

Today is the Muslim holiday Eid al-Adha. Eid al-Adha marks the tenth day of DuhlHijjah, the last month of the Islamic year. It is known as the day of sacrifice because it honors Abraham/Ibrahim’s willingness to obey God even at the cost of sacrificing his son. The holiday is marked with much prayer an the sacrifice of a lamb. 


kilele:

Silver X, 24, rap artist and singer ‘My album is a great hit. Small kids sing it, old mamas and papas. I  don’t go into politics in my singing – it’s a bit risky. I sang a song  about how hard it is when you go for a job and they want to know what  tribe you’re from, who your father is. It brought me into conflict with  the government. My father died in the war. He was shot by his wife’s  brother – they were soldiers. My mother took us to Uganda and I was  educated in Kampala. When we achieved independence, I was shocked. There  was a four-day concert and I performed at the cultural centre. When  they raised the flag, I was ­shedding tears – for what had ­happened in  the past, but also for joy.’
from South Sudan: Nation Builders by Zen Nelson/Institute via Guardian

kilele:

Silver X, 24, rap artist and singer

‘My album is a great hit. Small kids sing it, old mamas and papas. I don’t go into politics in my singing – it’s a bit risky. I sang a song about how hard it is when you go for a job and they want to know what tribe you’re from, who your father is. It brought me into conflict with the government. My father died in the war. He was shot by his wife’s brother – they were soldiers. My mother took us to Uganda and I was educated in Kampala. When we achieved independence, I was shocked. There was a four-day concert and I performed at the cultural centre. When they raised the flag, I was ­shedding tears – for what had ­happened in the past, but also for joy.’

from South Sudan: Nation Builders by Zen Nelson/Institute via Guardian