Obruni Radio

nationalpost:

U.S. ambassador to Libya killed in rocket attack in BenghaziThe U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other embassy staff were killed in a rocket attack on their car, a Libyan official said, as they were rushed from a consular building stormed by militants denouncing a U.S.-made film insulting the Prophet Mohammad.Gunmen had attacked and burned the U.S. consulate in the eastern city of Benghazi, a center of last year’s uprising against Muammar Gaddafi, late on Tuesday evening, killing one U.S. consular official. The building was evacuated.
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nationalpost:

U.S. ambassador to Libya killed in rocket attack in Benghazi
The U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other embassy staff were killed in a rocket attack on their car, a Libyan official said, as they were rushed from a consular building stormed by militants denouncing a U.S.-made film insulting the Prophet Mohammad.

Gunmen had attacked and burned the U.S. consulate in the eastern city of Benghazi, a center of last year’s uprising against Muammar Gaddafi, late on Tuesday evening, killing one U.S. consular official. The building was evacuated.


What does Gaddafi's death mean for Africa? →

fyeahafrica:

A grandson of Nelson Mandela is named Gadaffi - a sign of how popular the late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi once was in South Africa and many other African countries.

With his image of a revolutionary, Col Gaddafi inspired South Africans to fight for their liberation, funding and arming the anti-apartheid movement as it fought white minority rule.

However, he also backed notorious rebel groups in Liberia and Sierra Leone and his demise could serve as a warning to the continent’s other “big-man” rulers.

After Mr Mandela became South Africa’s first black president in 1994, he rejected pressure from Western leaders - including then-US President Bill Clinton - to sever ties with Col Gaddafi, who bankrolled his election campaign.

“Those who feel irritated by our friendship with President Gaddafi can go jump in the pool,” he said.

Instead, Mr Mandela played a key role in ending Col Gaddafi’s pariah status in the West by brokering a deal with the UK over the 1988 Lockerbie bombing.

It led to Col Gaddafi handing over Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi for trial in Scotland. He was convicted in 2001, before being released eight years later on compassionate grounds - a decision Mr Mandela welcomed.

Mr Mandela saw the Lockerbie deal as one of his biggest foreign policy achievements.

“No-one can deny that the friendship and trust between South Africa and Libya played a significant part in arriving at this solution… It vindicates our view that talking to one another and searching for peaceful solutions remain the surest way to resolve differences and advance peace and progress in the world,” he said in 1999, as he approached the end of his presidency.

“It was pure expediency to call on democratic South Africa to turn its back on Libya and [Col] Gaddafi, who had assisted us in obtaining democracy.”

[read more]


Obruni Radio - Love Songs Episode

Hey lovely listeners!

Tonight Obruni Radio will be featuring the best hiplife love songs Ghana and Nigeria have to offer. Listen in to find out more about why Ghanaians and Nigerians are so good at singing about love, learn about Twipop (a new Ghanaian music genre), and hear the latest African news from around the globe.

In case you missed out on reading your African news this week Gaddafi is dead, a vaccine for malaria has been invented (now only 50% effective, but in a few years who knows), Tunisia is voting this Sunday, Liberian presidential candidate Tubman collapsed due to malaria (cough cough - actually because he realizes he isn’t going to be the next Liberian president), and former Botswana President Festus Mogae is trying to decriminalize prostitution and homosexuality in the name of curbing the country’s high HIV/AIDS rates.

Tune in to WIUX at 7pm Eastern Time for your weekly fix of African news and music brought to you by your favorite Obruni DJ Adwoa.


futurejournalismproject:

In February, the Globe and Mail published a map to show Moammar Gadhafi’s influence in Africa.
In Mali, for example, Gadhafi’s money and diplomacy have helped resolve conflicts between rebels and the government.
And in Sudan, the 20,000 troop peacekeeping mission includes African Union troops that are heavily funded by Gadhafi’s Libya.
We modified the map for display here so click through to learn more.
H/T: Torie (The Political Notebook) via G+.
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futurejournalismproject:

In February, the Globe and Mail published a map to show Moammar Gadhafi’s influence in Africa.

In Mali, for example, Gadhafi’s money and diplomacy have helped resolve conflicts between rebels and the government.

And in Sudan, the 20,000 troop peacekeeping mission includes African Union troops that are heavily funded by Gadhafi’s Libya.

We modified the map for display here so click through to learn more.

H/T: Torie (The Political Notebook) via G+.

(Source: futurejournalismproject)